The Case of Dwight Jones’s Birthday Party, And Supposed NCAA Infractions

The Case of Dwight Jones's Birthday Was Open-And-Shut

Before most people even heard about North Carolina wide receiver Dwight Jones‘s alleged birthday party eligibility scare, it was already non-news. Jones, who the university (already in trouble with the powers-that-be) declared ineligible for their upcoming Independence Bowl date with Missouri, said he was sorry and was magically reinstated. His birthday bash — which probably would have gone down as his most consequential yet — may or may not happen at 778 Sports Lounge now, but will surely fail to include his likeness, and fail to give out $500 cash to some “lucky ladies” in attendance. Given how quick this whole thing was dismissed, you can all go back to laughing at the NCAA’s “enforcement” of the “rules” they come out and preach about every so often. While I’m not in favor of stupid penalties like this one (especially for seniors in their final game), if you’re going to pursue in one instance (see: the Great Sammy Watkins Caper of Eight Days Ago), then pursue in all instances. These folks, being college-educated as they are, understand this perception. So it was no surprise when the following occurred before the dust even settled on Jones’s situation:

South Carolina‘s C.C. Whitlock and Jadeveon “Doo Doo” Clowney (of all the nicknames?) are plastered all over a Facebook event sponsored by #TeamCascade (sure, hashtags!). They’re still debating who-knew-what about the circumstances (if the players agreed berforehand, if they’re getting paid, etc.), but one thing’s for certain — no one cares anymore. So much so that if you follow the previous link, you’ll find a Deadspin story starting with the phrase “Not This Shit Again.” That piece also echoes my earlier sentiment: Yes these rules are stupid, but since they exist, just knock it off, athletes. We wouldn’t watch the games if we didn’t think you were good, so please try your best to stay on the field. Much appreciated.

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